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 Post subject: Walker question.
PostPosted: Thu Jul 07, 2016 2:13 pm 
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Joined: Fri Jun 17, 2016 10:43 am
Posts: 46
I have a 1970's made Walker replica coming my way but it has a BRASS frame. Never seen or heard of one before and can find little information. I know they didn't really exist but does anyone on here have any information on this unusual revolver?


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 Post subject: Re: Walker question.
PostPosted: Thu Jul 07, 2016 2:35 pm 
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Jack......

No...never heard of one and pretty sure they didn't exist historically. The Confederates built brass frame revolvers because of the need to produce weapons cheap and in greater numbers. However where the Original Walkers were built to carry loads that were for the time, effectively rifle loads (60 fffg) I would suggest not loading a brass frame revolver anywhere near that hot.......maybe Mick or someone else will come on and make suggestions. I have only owned one brass framed pocket revolver that I think I loaded with 12-15 gr fffg.

Personally I would own one except for decoration in the "man cave".........but that's just me. ;)

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Doug/Mule Man

"Nope!....If I gotta choose.....I'll ride the mule and pack the horse!" WD Bennett


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 Post subject: Re: Walker question.
PostPosted: Thu Jul 07, 2016 5:12 pm 
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Yeah, with you on that one, Mule Man. Haven't found any evidence and I don't think I will. It's just a curio and there's no way I will fire. For the man cave indeed.


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 Post subject: Re: Walker question.
PostPosted: Thu Jul 07, 2016 6:01 pm 
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:D

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Doug/Mule Man

"Nope!....If I gotta choose.....I'll ride the mule and pack the horse!" WD Bennett


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 Post subject: Re: Walker question.
PostPosted: Thu Jul 07, 2016 9:36 pm 
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Interesting Jack..... have never heard
of any one building a brass framed Walker or Dragoon. They handle way toooo much charge for a brass frame to hold up long before it's stretched.
Just go very light loads. Should be very pleasant to shoot.


Creek


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 Post subject: Re: Walker question.
PostPosted: Fri Jul 08, 2016 4:40 am 
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Not going to fire it, Creek. Don't really know why I bought it either! Just a unusual piece for my cabin wall. I know they didn't really exist but it's a bit of fun and it was cheap. Its kinda like something you might see in a Spaghetti Western!


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 Post subject: Re: Walker question.
PostPosted: Fri Jul 08, 2016 3:42 pm 
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Howdy!

Already well covered above.

There were no brass framed Walkers, until the Italians decided to invent one a little over a hundred years or so later. :)

Trivia. And with the risk of using a "Universal," there never were brass framed American revolvers. What are brass framed revolvers now were actually "gun metal" back then which is a yellow bronze. And stronger than soft brass that the Italians now
use.

Somewhere after Val Forgett and the Italians pioneered repro Colts circa 1958ish with the brass framed 'Lee' ... the Italians started making Colt and Remington steel framed revolvers out of cheaper and more easy to form soft brass. And being a lower price, they were and ARE, popular.

m

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 Post subject: Re: Walker question.
PostPosted: Fri Jul 08, 2016 3:43 pm 
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Howdy!

I still see brass framed ones in "Hell on Wheels."

:(

m

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 Post subject: Re: Walker question.
PostPosted: Fri Jul 08, 2016 5:30 pm 
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There were a few 'brass' pistols back in the day. Griswold and Gunnison for example. The Southern States used church bells etc due to the drastic shortage of steel. The one that annoys me are the brass trigger guard/back strap seen on Italian 'Peacemakers'.


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 Post subject: Re: Walker question.
PostPosted: Sun Jul 10, 2016 9:09 am 
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Howdy!

Referring to the originals as "brass" is a modern hobbyism/collectorism.

Brass is an alloy of copper and zinc. Bronze (in the 19th century aka "gun metal" is/was an alloy of copper and tin (sometimes with trace other metals like nickel or zinc).

It was somewhat common for the Confederates to smelt down bronze church bells for their firearms industry. Depending on the mix, more copper in the alloy would make it redder and one sometimes sees it in their revolver frames as well as uniform buttons.

Brass, especially when alloyed with added lead for easy of casting, makes an okay BP gun frame for plinking and even for m moderate shooting. IMHO, there are far more people pouring rounds of repro's than likely ever did originals.

There is tons of literature and on-line comments on "brass frame revolvers' and their flaws of shooting out of alignment, etc. But, in brief, with the lack of power in BP loads even filling the chambers, warping a frame requires a lot of shootings. However, a common problem is that high use "chews" up the arbor mount in the recoil shield and worse yet the back of the steel cylinder pounds it way into the recoil shield area due to repeated recoil.

Originals did not suffer from that because they were made of gun metal (bronze) which is harder than soft brass, and were not NUG fire thousands of times.

But, most people, even educated and experienced firearms people and authors, usually always call them "brass" whether CS revolvers, Henry, or Winchester rifles.

Yeah, I can't 'get' people to stop referring to the Remington Model 1863 "New Army" Revolver as a M1858 Remington either.

:) :) :)

m

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