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 Post subject: Quanah Parker
PostPosted: Mon Nov 23, 2015 3:38 pm 
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As a kid I spent my summers with my grandparents on their farm outside of the town of Quanah Texas. Quanah was named after "Quanah Parker"..........here's a brief biography about him.
Quanah Parker was the last Chief of the Commanches and never lost a battle to the white man. His tribe roamed over the area where Pampa stands. He was never captured by the Army, but decided to surrender and lead his tribe into the white man's culture, only when he saw that there was no alternative. His was the last tribe in the Staked Plains to come into the reservation system.

Quanah, meaning "fragrant," was born about 1850, son of Comanche Chief Peta Nocona and Cynthia Ann Parker, a white girl taken captive during the 1836 raid on Parker's Fort, Texas. Cynthia Ann Parker was recaptured, along with her daughter, during an 1860 raid on the Pease River in northwest Texas. She had spent 24 years among the Comanche, however, and thus never readjusted to living with the whites again.

She died in Anderson County, Texas, in 1864 shortly after the death of her daughter, Prairie Flower. Ironically, Cynthia Ann's son would adjust remarkably well to living among the white men. But first he would lead a bloody war against them.

Quanah and the Quahada Comanche, of whom his father, Peta Nocona had been chief, refused to accept the provisions of the 1867 Treaty of Medicine Lodge, which confined the southern Plains Indians to a reservation, promising to clothe the Indians and turn them into farmers in imitation of the white settlers.

Knowing of past lies and deceptive treaties of the "White man", Quanah decided to remain on the warpath, raiding in Texas and Mexico and out maneuvering Army Colonel Ranald S. Mackenzie and others. He was almost killed during the attack on buffalo hunters at Adobe Walls in the Texas Panhandle in 1874. The U.S. Army was relentless in its Red River campaign of 1874-75. Quanah's allies, the Quahada were weary and starving.

Mackenzie sent Jacob J. Sturm, a physician and post interpreter, to solicit the Quahada's surrender. Sturm found Quanah, whom he called "a young man of much influence with his people," and pleaded his case. Quanah rode to a mesa, where he saw a wolf come toward him, howl and trot away to the northeast. Overhead, an eagle "glided lazily and then whipped his wings in the direction of Fort Sill," in the words of Jacob Sturm. This was a sign, Quanah thought, and on June 2, 1875, he and his band surrendered at Fort Sill in present-day Oklahoma.

Biographer Bill Neeley writes:

"Not only did Quanah pass within the span of a single lifetime from a Stone Age warrior to a statesman in the age of the Industrial Revolution, but he accepted the challenge and responsibility of leading the whole Comanche tribe on the difficult road toward their new existence."

Quanah was traveling the "white man's road," but he did it his way. He refused to give up polygamy, much to the reservation agents' chagrin. Reservation agents being political appointees of the Federal Government, their main concern was to destroy all vestiges of Native American life and replace their culture with that of theirs. Quanah Parker also used peyote, negotiated grazing rights with Texas cattlemen, and invested in a railroad. He learned English, became a reservation judge, lobbied Congress and pleaded the cause of the Comanche Nation. Among his friends were cattleman Charles Goodnight and President Theodore Roosevelt. He considered himself a man who tried to do right both to the people of his tribe and to his "pale-faced friends".

It wasn't easy. Mackenzie appointed Quanah Parker as the chief of the Comanche shortly after his surrender, but the older chiefs resented Parker’s youth, and his white blood in particular." And in 1892, when Quanah Parker signed the Jerome Agreement that broke up the reservation, the Comanche were split into two factions: (1). those who realized that all that could be done had been done for their nation; and (2). those who blamed Chief Parker for selling their country."

Quanah Parker died on February 23, 1911, and was buried next to his mother, whose body he had re-interred at Ft. Sill Military cemetery on Chiefs Knoll in Oklahoma only three months earlier. For his courage, integrity and tremendous insight, Quanah Parker’s life tells the story of one of America's greatest leaders and a true Texas Hero.

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Our farm had an old rock barn that had apparently been erected back in the late 19th century as a storage for hay and later cotton seed meal for a huge horse ranch. My uncle found a '51 Colt laying out on the ground, with conical rounds still in part of the cylinder. Research found that there had been a "running battle" on approximately the location of our farm, between Comanches and "whites".....don't remember if it was cavalry or Texas Rangers??? In any case the revolver likely belonged to either a Comanche brave or civilian/ranger as it was too late in the Indian wars to have been "likely" carried by a cav trooper....if it was in fact from that battle. The is a few small hills near by called "Medicine Mounds"....likely ancient volcanic cones, but where Quanah and his tribe "made medicine" on this the highest elevation for hundreds of miles.
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As a kid you could climb to the top and look for arrow heads and such...pretty well picked over when I was there........but the land owners eventually fenced it off. We drove 50 or so head of cattle from just south of Quanah, past Medicine Mounds to Chillicothe Texas.....not the longest drive (20 miles) I was ever on but the only one down the bar ditch along a major highway (HWY 287) :D

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Doug/Mule Man

"Nope!....If I gotta choose.....I'll ride the mule and pack the horse!" WD Bennett


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 Post subject: Re: Quanah Parker
PostPosted: Mon Nov 23, 2015 6:05 pm 
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Neat post thanks for sharing Mule Man. We appreciate it.

Shotgun Steve


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 Post subject: Re: Quanah Parker
PostPosted: Mon Nov 23, 2015 11:31 pm 
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Thanx again for another good telling Mule Man


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 Post subject: Re: Quanah Parker
PostPosted: Mon Jan 18, 2016 1:28 am 
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Location: Lubbock County, TX
I have been to Texas twice as a military man. First stationed at the Airbase in Wichita Falls,Texas then in later years at Fort Bliss in El Paso. I finally made my home here in Lubbock. I have always had interest in all things Native American. Your brief history of Quanah Parker is a good start for me as I learn more about Texas history. Thanks.












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 Post subject: Re: Quanah Parker
PostPosted: Mon Jan 18, 2016 12:22 pm 
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Glad you liked it. I used to think that part of the world was heaven....mostly because of the farm and the stability of my Godly grandparents......however by the time I had spent two years after high school helping my grandparents put in their last wheat crops......I decided that the heat was too much and the pretty girls were either too few or those that were........had little interest in me. I spent a month working in the cotton compress there in Quanah....and it was 105+ every day..............I got homesick for the Colorado Rockies and went home. Sadly the grandparents farm was sold by my uncle and I never had the opportunity to return.

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"Nope!....If I gotta choose.....I'll ride the mule and pack the horse!" WD Bennett


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